Ms. Minner's Classroom

A Louisville Middle School Classroom

Week of April 30: Volume Review & Bivariate Data

April 22nd, 2018 by

Bivariate data or data related to two variables is displayed on a scatter plot. The data points on a scatter plot are NOT connected by a line. A scatter plot may show a relationship (also called an association or correlation) between the variables. This relationship can be linear, nonlinear, positive, and/or negative.  If no pattern between the data points is evident, we say there is no association between the variables. A line of best fit or trend line can be drawn and used to make predictions about data points that are not plotted on the graph already. When drawing a line of best fit, approximately half the data points should be above the trend line and half below.

Two-way tables are frequency tables. They display population data that has been categorized two-ways. In the two-way table below, the data has been categorized by grade level and favorite subject.


 

Monday, April 30

(Portions of the lesson plans were carried over from last week.)

Common Core Standards and Extended Standards
8.SP.1 Construct and interpret scatter plots for bivariate measurement data to investigate patterns of association between two quantities. Describe patterns such as clustering, outliers, positive or negative association, linear association, and nonlinear association.
8.SP.2 Know that straight lines are widely used to model relationships between two quantitative variables. For scatter plots that suggest a linear association, informally fit a straight line, and informally assess the model fit by judging the closeness of the data points to the line.
8.SP.3 Use the equation of a linear model to solve problems in the context of bivariate measurement data, interpreting the slope and intercept.
8.SP.4 Understand that patterns of association can also be seen in bivariate categorical data by displaying frequencies and relative frequencies in a two-way table. Construct and interpret a two-way table summarizing data on two categorical variables collected from the same subjects. Use relative frequencies calculated for rows or columns to describe possible association between the two variables.

Student Objectives
I can differentiate between positive and negative associations, and linear and nonlinear associations.
I can identify outliers.
I can create and use a trend line to make predictions.
I can write the equation of a line and interpret the slope and y-intercept.
I can complete a two-way table.
I can solve problems and answer questions involving proportional and nonproportional relationships, slope, y-intercept, slope-intercept form, linear and nonlinear relationships, functions, equations and systems of equations, volume, and statistics.

Bellwork
IXL continuous diagnostic
XtraMath

Lesson (Scatter Plots)
1. Celebrity Heights activity
2. Guided notes, demonstration, and guided practice: scatter plots layered book
3. Associations task cards challenge: positive, negative, or no association between given variables
4. IXL demonstration: scatter plot skills
5. Independent practice: scatter plots homework and IXL to-do list

Closing
Quizlet: linear associations

Homework
The IXL module 14 to-do list will be due on Friday, May 4. On May 4, there will also be a test over bivariate data (scatter plots and two-way tables).


Tuesday, May 1

Common Core Standards and Extended Standards
8.SP.1 Construct and interpret scatter plots for bivariate measurement data to investigate patterns of association between two quantities. Describe patterns such as clustering, outliers, positive or negative association, linear association, and nonlinear association.
8.SP.2 Know that straight lines are widely used to model relationships between two quantitative variables. For scatter plots that suggest a linear association, informally fit a straight line, and informally assess the model fit by judging the closeness of the data points to the line.
8.SP.3 Use the equation of a linear model to solve problems in the context of bivariate measurement data, interpreting the slope and intercept.
8.SP.4 Understand that patterns of association can also be seen in bivariate categorical data by displaying frequencies and relative frequencies in a two-way table. Construct and interpret a two-way table summarizing data on two categorical variables collected from the same subjects. Use relative frequencies calculated for rows or columns to describe possible association between the two variables.

Student Objectives
I can differentiate between positive and negative associations, and linear and nonlinear associations.
I can identify outliers.
I can create and use a trend line to make predictions.
I can write the equation of a line and interpret the slope and y-intercept.
I can complete a two-way table.
I can solve problems and answer questions involving proportional and nonproportional relationships, slope, y-intercept, slope-intercept form, linear and nonlinear relationships, functions, equations and systems of equations, volume, and statistics.

Bellwork
XtraMath
IXL module 14 to-do list

Lesson (Scatter Plots & Two-Way Tables)
1. Go over homework.
2. Demonstration: Illuminations “Line of Best Fit Tool”
3. Scatter plots task cards: interpreting scatter plots
4. Demonstration and guided practice with selected items
5. Cooperative practice: #1, 4, 5, 6 on pages 454 and 455, #1 on page 462, #3a on page 462
6. Independent practice: IXL module 14 to-do list and two-way tables worksheet

Closing
Writing prompt in Schoology: “What I know about scatter plots…..”

Homework
The IXL module 14 to-do list will be due on Friday, May 4. On May 4, there will also be a quiz over bivariate data (scatter plots and two-way tables). Finish the assigned workbook page and the two-way tables worksheet. Finish the two-way tables worksheet.


Wednesday, May 2

(Shortened class due to state math test)

Common Core Standards and Extended Standards
8.SP.1 Construct and interpret scatter plots for bivariate measurement data to investigate patterns of association between two quantities. Describe patterns such as clustering, outliers, positive or negative association, linear association, and nonlinear association.
8.SP.2 Know that straight lines are widely used to model relationships between two quantitative variables. For scatter plots that suggest a linear association, informally fit a straight line, and informally assess the model fit by judging the closeness of the data points to the line.
8.SP.3 Use the equation of a linear model to solve problems in the context of bivariate measurement data, interpreting the slope and intercept.
8.SP.4 Understand that patterns of association can also be seen in bivariate categorical data by displaying frequencies and relative frequencies in a two-way table. Construct and interpret a two-way table summarizing data on two categorical variables collected from the same subjects. Use relative frequencies calculated for rows or columns to describe possible association between the two variables.

Student Objectives
I can differentiate between positive and negative associations, and linear and nonlinear associations.
I can identify outliers.
I can create and use a trend line to make predictions.
I can write the equation of a line and interpret the slope and y-intercept.
I can complete a two-way table.
I can solve problems and answer questions involving proportional and nonproportional relationships, slope, y-intercept, slope-intercept form, linear and nonlinear relationships, functions, equations and systems of equations, volume, and statistics.

Bellwork
IXL module 14 to-do list

Lesson (Bivariate Data Review)
1. Go over two-way tables homework.
2. Two-way tables match and paste activity with a partner
3. Independent practice: bivariate data review packet and IXL module 14 to-do list

Closing

Homework
The IXL module 14 to-do list will be due on Friday, May 4. On May 4, there will also be a test over bivariate data (scatter plots and two-way tables). Finish the bivariate data review packet.


Thursday, May 3

(Shortened class due to state math test)

Common Core Standards and Extended Standards
8.SP.1 Construct and interpret scatter plots for bivariate measurement data to investigate patterns of association between two quantities. Describe patterns such as clustering, outliers, positive or negative association, linear association, and nonlinear association.
8.SP.2 Know that straight lines are widely used to model relationships between two quantitative variables. For scatter plots that suggest a linear association, informally fit a straight line, and informally assess the model fit by judging the closeness of the data points to the line.
8.SP.3 Use the equation of a linear model to solve problems in the context of bivariate measurement data, interpreting the slope and intercept.
8.SP.4 Understand that patterns of association can also be seen in bivariate categorical data by displaying frequencies and relative frequencies in a two-way table. Construct and interpret a two-way table summarizing data on two categorical variables collected from the same subjects. Use relative frequencies calculated for rows or columns to describe possible association between the two variables.

Student Objectives
I can differentiate between positive and negative associations, and linear and nonlinear associations.
I can identify outliers.
I can create and use a trend line to make predictions.
I can write the equation of a line and interpret the slope and y-intercept.
I can complete a two-way table.

Bellwork
IXL continuous diagnostic
XtraMath

Lesson (Bivariate Data Review)
1. Flashcard Machine math vocabulary challenge
2. Go over homework.
3. Bivariate data review

Closing

Homework
The IXL module 14 to-do list will be due tomorrow. Tomorrow there will also be a test over bivariate data (scatter plots and two-way tables).


Friday, May 4

Common Core Standards and Extended Standards
8.SP.1 Construct and interpret scatter plots for bivariate measurement data to investigate patterns of association between two quantities. Describe patterns such as clustering, outliers, positive or negative association, linear association, and nonlinear association.
8.SP.2 Know that straight lines are widely used to model relationships between two quantitative variables. For scatter plots that suggest a linear association, informally fit a straight line, and informally assess the model fit by judging the closeness of the data points to the line.
8.SP.3 Use the equation of a linear model to solve problems in the context of bivariate measurement data, interpreting the slope and intercept.
8.SP.4 Understand that patterns of association can also be seen in bivariate categorical data by displaying frequencies and relative frequencies in a two-way table. Construct and interpret a two-way table summarizing data on two categorical variables collected from the same subjects. Use relative frequencies calculated for rows or columns to describe possible association between the two variables.

Student Objectives
I can differentiate between positive and negative associations, and linear and nonlinear associations.
I can identify outliers.
I can create and use a trend line to make predictions.
I can write the equation of a line and interpret the slope and y-intercept.
I can complete a two-way table.

Bellwork
IXL module 14 to-do list

Lesson (Bivariate Data Test)
1. Review key ideas
2. Bivariate data test

Closing

Homework
Have a wonderful weekend!