Ms. Minner's Classroom

A Louisville Middle School Classroom

Week of October 16, 2017

October 15th, 2017 by

Scientific notation is a method of writing very large and very small numbers in a shorter form. A number written in scientific notation includes a number between 1 and 10 multiplied by a power of ten. Examples of numbers written in scientific notation are usually found in math and science textbooks, journals, and magazines. Scientists and mathematicians write numbers in scientific notation. Very small and very large distances, masses, and amounts can be written easily in scientific notation. Large numbers written in scientific notation have positive exponents. Small numbers written in scientific notation have negative exponents.

Your calculator has several different features to help you work with numbers in scientific notation. You can enter numbers written in scientific notation, and your calculator will convert them into standard form when you press =. You can use scientific notation mode to convert numbers from standard notation into scientific notation. Your calculator also allows you to enter numbers written in calculator notation (E notation). When performing operations (+,-, x, /) with numbers written in scientific notation, you must either enter your numbers with parentheses or use calculator notation; or you will get the wrong answer due to order of operations issues.


Monday, October 16

Common Core Standards and Extended Standards
8.EE.3 Use numbers expressed in the form of a single digit times an integer power of 10 to estimate very large and very small quantities, and to express how many times as much one is than the other.

Student Objectives
I can recognize numbers written in scientific notation.
I can convert large numbers written in scientific notation into standard form.
I can convert large numbers written in standard form into scientific notation.
I can write large numbers in calculator notation.

Bellwork
Students will complete Math Minute 24.

Lesson (Scientific Notation)
1. Video: http://www.shmoop.com/video/scientific-notation
2. Scientific notation mystery activity
3. Jeopardy game
Scientific Notation Jeopardy: Large Numbers

4.  Scientific notation task cards-round 2
5.  Pass back exponent rules quiz and go over correct answers.
6.  Independent work: front side of exponents & scientific notation review worksheet

Closing
Journal entry/exit ticket: 

Download (DOCX, 15KB)

Homework
On Wednesday, there will be a test over exponents and scientific notation. The IXL module 2 to-do list will also be due. Complete the front side of the review worksheet.

Links
Check out my scientific notation or exponents links page. Just type “scientific notation” or “exponents” in the search box on any page.


Tuesday, October 17

Common Core Standards and Extended Standards
8.EE.3 Use numbers expressed in the form of a single digit times an integer power of 10 to estimate very large and very small quantities, and to express how many times as much one is than the other.
8.EE.A.4 Perform operations with numbers expressed in scientific notation, including problems where both decimal and scientific notation are used. Use scientific notation and choose units of appropriate size for measurements of very large or very small quantities (e.g., use millimeters per year for seafloor spreading). Interpret scientific notation that has been generated by technology.

Student Objectives
I can recognize numbers written in scientific notation.
I can convert small numbers written in scientific notation into standard form.
I can convert small numbers written in standard form into scientific notation.
I can write small numbers in scientific notation using calculator notation.
I can simplify expressions containing exponents.

Bellwork
Students will complete Math Minute 25.

Lesson (Scientific Notation & Exponents Review)
1. Schoology discussion: “Large Number Trivia in Scientific Notation”
2. Go over homework: front side of review worksheet
3. Converting Small Numbers into Scientific Notation game
4. Exponent properties hurdles game
5. Independent practice: complete the back of the review worksheet

Closing
Journal entry/exit ticket:

Download (DOCX, 19KB)

Homework
Tomorrow, there will be a test over exponents and scientific notation. Complete the back of the review worksheet and your IXL module 2 to-do list.


Wednesday, October 18

Common Core Standards and Extended Standards
8.EE.3 Use numbers expressed in the form of a single digit times an integer power of 10 to estimate very large and very small quantities, and to express how many times as much one is than the other.
8.EE.A.4 Perform operations with numbers expressed in scientific notation, including problems where both decimal and scientific notation are used. Use scientific notation and choose units of appropriate size for measurements of very large or very small quantities (e.g., use millimeters per year for seafloor spreading). Interpret scientific notation that has been generated by technology.

Student Objectives
I can convert numbers from scientific notation to standard form and from standard form to scientific notation.
With a calculator, I can add, subtract, multiply and divide numbers written in scientific notation.
I can solve word problems involving scientific notation.

Bellwork
Students will complete Math Minute 26.

Lesson (Exponents & Scientific Notation Unit Test)
1. Go over homework: review sheet
2. Test over exponents and scientific notation
3. Independent practice: IXL module 3 to-do list

Closing
XtraMath

Homework
Work on the IXL, grade 8, W.6 one-step equations.


Thursday, October 19

Common Core Standards and Extended Standards
EE.68.6a Solve a 1-step linear equation (e.g., y + 3 = 5).
EE.68.6b Identify the operation needed to solve a given 1-step linear equation (the inverse operation).
EE.68.6c Solve for an unknown number within a number sentence (e.g., 5 + x = 8).
EE.68.3a Solve an algebraic expression or inequality involving variables.

Bellwork
Students will complete Math Minute 27.

Lesson (Basic Algebra Review/Solving One-Step Equations)
1. Generate interest: “Let’s start with something easy that has several easy ways to solve it:  x+6=10. What’s the answer? How did you figure out the answer?” Students will share their strategies.
2. Algebra tiles strategy modeled by teacher: Virtual Algebra Tiles
3. Journal entry: steps for solving one-step equations algebraically with 4 examples-one for each operation

Download (PDF, 52KB)


4. Guided practice: Interactivate: Equations Solver
5. Guided practice with one-step equations bingo game
6. Paired practice with one-step equations: Algebra Four
7. Cooperative practice: one-step equations task cards
8. Independent practice:

Download (PDF, 21KB)


Download (PDF, 27KB)

Closing
Exit ticket:

Download (DOCX, 18KB)

Homework
Finish the solving one-step equations worksheet. On Tuesday, there will be a quiz over one- and two-step equations.


Friday, October 20, 2016

Common Core Standards and Extended Standards
EE.68.6a Solve a 1-step linear equation (e.g., y + 3 = 5).
EE.68.6b Identify the operation needed to solve a given 1-step linear equation (the inverse operation).
EE.68.6c Solve for an unknown number within a number sentence (e.g., 5 + x = 8).
EE.68.3a Solve an algebraic expression or inequality involving variables.

Students Objectives
I can solve one- and two-step equations algebraically.

Bellwork
Students will complete Math Minute 39.

Lesson (Solving 2-Step Equations)
1. Pass back exponents and scientific notation test. Go over correct answers. Answer questions. Offer opportunity to retake or correct for additional credit.
1. Go over homework.
2. Review solving one-step equations with writing prompt:

Download (PDF, 93KB)


3. Journal entry: solving 2-step equations

Download (PDF, 21KB)


4. Guided practice with dry erase boards and markers: two-step equations
5. Cooperative practice: two-step equations task cards
6. Independent practice: finish two-step equations worksheet, homework if not completed in class
7. Online independent practice: two-step equations links in “basic equations & inequalities” folder in Schoology

Closing

Homework
Finish two-step equations worksheet if not finished in class. On Friday, there will be a quiz over solving equations.


Friday, October 20

Common Core Standards and Extended Standards

Student Objectives

Bellwork
Students will complete Math Minute 28.

Lesson (Review: Two-Step Equations)
1. Go over homework.
2.
3.

Closing

Homework
On Tuesday, there will be a quiz over solving one and two-step equations.